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August 22nd, 2011

What is a Grantor Trust?

(Estate Planners) - One type of grantor trust that is useful in estate planning is a grantor trust. This trust allows the grantor (the individual who establishes the trust) to have control over the trust assets and receive income that is created from the trust. The grantor trust is often called a living trust or a revocable trust.

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August 15th, 2011

What is a Dynasty Trust?

(Estate Planners) - A dynasty trust is a type of generation-skipping trust that can provide substantial savings on estate tax. When you consider the fact that estate tax can climb to a rate that is as much as fifty-five percent, and that each generation will have to pay estate taxes, you could hypothetically save up to eighty percent of your estate throughout the course of three generations.

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July 18th, 2011

What is a Testamentary Trust Will?

(Estate Planners) - A common estate planning tool is the testamentary trust will. This type of will is used to set up a trust or trusts that part of or all of your estate will be transferred into when you die. The testamentary trust will is sometimes just referred to as a ‘testamentary trust’ and is similar in structure to the family trust, but with some distinct differences that can be very advantageous over other types of trusts, particularly if you are planning on leaving your estate to minor heirs, young adults, or children with disabilities.

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July 11th, 2011

What is a Statutory Will?

(Estate Planners) - One of the simplest wills is the statutory will. The statutory will is a standard legal form that a testator (person making a will) completes by filling in particular information and checking boxes. The statutory will is binding and considering legally valid in only a handful of states, so simply downloading and printing a statutory will form and then filling it out certainly gives no guarantees that it will ever be accepted in the jurisdiction where you live, unless you have checked to be sure that your state recognizes such a form.

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June 20th, 2011

What is a Pour Over Will?

(Estate Planners) - One type of testamentary instrument that is widely used in combination with a trust that was created during a person’s lifetime is a pour over will. A pour over will typically dictates that, when the testator passes away, all assets and property that they own that have not previously been transferred into the trust during the person’s lifetime automatically pour over into the trust.

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June 13th, 2011

What is an Oral Will?

(Estate Planners) - An oral will, also sometimes referred to as a nuncupative will, as the name suggests, is merely a verbal accounting of a testator of how he or she wishes for property and assets to be distributed upon death. The oral will is similar to a traditional (written) will, but is spoken. It is rare for an oral will to be used in modern times, although it is certainly a viable option in some circumstances, such as in an emergency situation where there is no time for a written will to be prepared before death occurs.

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May 23rd, 2011

What is a Deathbed Will?

(Estate Planners) - ather than die intestate, or without a will, some people choose to create a deathbed will when they realize that their death is imminent. The deathbed will is sometimes called a holographic will. This simply refers to the fact that it is usually handwritten. Regardless of its hasty creation, there are some jurisdictions that will recognize a deathbed will as a binding and valid last will and testament.

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April 18th, 2011

What is a Grantor Retained Income Trust (“GRIT”)?

(Estate Planners) - A grantor retained income trust, which is also known by the acronym of GRIT, is a frequently used trust that can help to reduce the amount of estate tax that is due when a person passes away with a large estate. The Grantor retained income trust can also provide an income stream for the creator of the trust that provides a steady flow of money during their lifetimes while allowing their heirs to benefit from their wealth upon the trust creator’s death. Thus, the reason for the name, grantor retained income trust.

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April 11th, 2011

What is a Testamentary Trust?

(Estate Planners) - The testamentary trust is a trust that is often created when a parent’s potential death might trigger the distributions of large sums of money, like life insurance policy proceeds, to minor children or young adult children. This type of trust often allows for a child to become more mature before being tasked with the responsibility of handling a lot of money.

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January 31st, 2011

What is a Generation Skipping Trust?

(Estate Planners) - A generation skipping trust is not just designed for the elite or wealthy. This type of trust provides a great way to safeguard any family’s assets from excess tax, creditors and ex-spouses looking for their “share” of the estate, just to name a few. The generation skipping trust also protects assets that might grow with time, like stocks.

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